Spelt Zucchini Bread


The weather lately has been so perfect it’s kind of unbelievable. I was led to believe that Daly City was the foggiest place on Earth and I would never see the sun, so the fact that it’s been in the low 70s and sunny for the past week or so makes me deliriously happy.

I’ve been doing okay with the fact that I’m no longer running, but Sunday morning was not easy. Mike ran a 5K in Golden Gate Park, and between the perfect weather and beautiful course, it kind of killed me a little bit to be stuck on the side taking pictures. I love the energy at races, even small ones like this… definitely something you DON’T get from doing the elliptical at the gym every day. (Honestly, as much as I miss running, I’m just happy I can still work out, even if the elliptical is totally lame).

I’ll be back out there soon enough.

I am starting to accumulate a bunch of different kinds of flour. It’s not really a bad thing, but my cupboards are FULL and we are moving in 11 days. The usual suspects, cake flour, whole wheat flour, bread flour, and all purpose are being crowded out by stuff like garbazno and spelt flour (and I need to make room for coconut flour, which I’ve heard so many good things about). Um, can I use the word flour a few more times?

Spelt flour is one of my favorite substitutes for all-purpose because it isn’t too dense so a 1 to 1 sub is easy, and I like the slightly nutty flavor it adds. I think it may be slightly more nutritious, too, which is always a bonus. For a bread like zucchini, which isn’t too exotic or exciting, it adds a little something extra that just plain flour doesn’t.

This recipe originally came from Cooks Illustrated, which I know doesn’t really appreciate having its recipes altered. I really liked the changes I made though… I decreased the sugar and subbed sucanat for half of it, and added some cinnamon. Bridget recommended scaling down the fat and replacing half of the butter with canola oil, and it worked beautifully. Draining the liquid out of the zucchini is completely brilliant because it keeps the bread from getting too soggy.

Recipe:
(adapted from The Way The Cookie Crumbles)

2 cups spelt flour, plus more for dusting
1 pound zucchini, washed and dried, ends and stems removed, cut into 1″ chunks
1/4 cup evaporated cane juice or granulated sugar (+ 2 Tbsp for mixing with zucchini)
1/4 cup sucanat
½ cup toasted walnuts, roughly chopped
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ cup plain yogurt
2 large eggs, beaten lightly
2 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled
2 tbsp canola oil

Preheat the oven to 375 and grease an 9″ x 5″ loaf pan. Dust with flour and shake out excess.

Put the zucchini chunks in the food processor with 2 T sugar and pulse until coarsely shredded. Put in a mesh strainer and drain for 30 minutes.

Whisk together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon and toss with the walnuts.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, sugars, yogurt, melted butter, and oil.

Squeeze any remaining liquid out of the zucchini, then mix into the egg mixture and stir well.

Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, stirring gently until all traces of flour disappear. Pour into prepared pan and bake until a toothpick comes out clean, 50-60 minutes.

Cool in the pan for 5-10 minutes, then turn out of the pan and cool completely on a wire rack.

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8 comments to Spelt Zucchini Bread

  • Wow. This look amazing. I would love it warmed with some small bit of butter on top. Yum!

    When I was injured last fall, it killed me to not be able to run. I was stuck in spinning classes and elliptical. Those don’t quite replace the thrill and joy of running.

  • Yay for sunny Bay Area weather! Where are you moving?
    What a great idea to use spelt flour, I’ve never tried it and have been wanting a reason to buy it…this looks like the perfect excuse :)

  • Cate

    Heather – We’re just moving abut a mile away because we need a bigger place before the kid comes, but staying in Daly City because it’s so convenient for my job

  • I’m dreading the day when I have to quit running!

  • I was recently introduced to spelt flour and loved the taste. I have some other random flours I need to use too. I bought teff flour for a Fine Cooking recipe and bet that would work in this recipe as well. I might give it a shot. It has a similar, sort of nutty flavor.
    Good luck on the move!

  • Viola Gary

    Hey Cate, you are a brave and pretty lady. Although we have never met, I like your personality. Hope all goes well with baby and moving. As for the bread, I have been using Spelt for over ten years now because I was advised by a nutritionist to cut back on sodium. I like bread but after looking at lables and such, it was sorta strange to change from uncontrolled to controlled use of salt. Anyhow, I started using recipes with low sodium and then was advised by a natural health instructor to stop using white flour, rice, sugar and it would stop or cause my migraines to subside and I would feel much better. Well with all the healthy eating changes I made, Spelt was introduced and I have not stopped using it for all my cooking and baking needs. This recipe is a favorite of mine and my friends and family. I don’t use any sodium except the leaveners and I use pineapple that is drained. I want to try this recipe for a comparison though. Thanks for the opportunity to rant a little and hope you have success in the future. Take care
    Viola

  • Why did you put 1 pound of zucchini instead of saying how many cups? I don’t know how much a pound of zucchini is, nor do I have a scale to weigh it. This sounds yummy, but I had to look for another recipe that says how many cups of zucchini, instead of pounds.

  • Cate

    The amount of zucchini can vary so much based on how finely it’s shredded and how tightly it’s packed.

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